Kodak and Film

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“Film has been – and will remain – a vital part of our culture,” said Jeff Clarke, Kodak chief executive officer. “With the support of the studios, we will continue to provide motion picture film, with its unparalleled richness and unique textures, to enable filmmakers to tell their stories and demonstrate their art.” Kodak Press Release, February 4, 2015

Film is a photo sensitive material that detects photons reflected off real world objects, and digital camera sensors detect the same photons. While these sensors may have slightly different responses, it is a relatively simple matter to convert one response into another. Where is the unparalleled richness and unique textures? It is a figment of Jeff Clarke’s imagination. It exists only in the delusional corporate culture at Kodak and perhaps in the minds of some Hollywood directors.

By their very nature, digital photos have more flexibility than film, and there are no unique textures. Mobile apps for camera phones give digital photos options that film never had, and computer software provides even greater capabilities.

For more about the delusions at Kodak see Kodak Alaris and the Fallacy of Film and Kodak Still Doesn’t Get It.

About Mark Mizen

I have over twenty years professional experience in all aspects of photography and digital imaging. I am Chair of the ISO WG5 TG2 committee responsible for physical properties and durability of imaging material and am currently with HID Global working on systems for security printing for IDs, licenses, and credit cards. Previously, I was Director of Digital Development at Creative Memories from 2009 to 2012 and was responsible for the Creative Memories digital products and services. I also established and directed the Creative Memories Technology Center, which evaluated new products prior to product introduction, assisted with production difficulties, and provided technical information to support product sales.
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